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STDs and Older Adults

STD/STI Awareness Month is a CDC campaign to bring visibility to Sexually Transmitted Diseases and Sexually Transmitted Infections and how they impact people's lives, and the importance of testing and prevention. People in LGBTQ+ individuals and communities face a Lack of adequate medical care and discrimination in healthcare leaving them at higher risk.

STDs are often thought of as concern for young people, but they affect people of all ages. In 2018, people age 50 and older made up 20% all new chlamydia cases. Also, syphilis cases among older adults increased by 50%. Half all peope living with HIV/AIDS are age 50 and older, and they make up 17% of new cases. Your doctor may not think to ask you about STDs and STIs. If you have a concern, ask. 

For more info on the CDC STD/STI Awareness month, see

https://www.cdc.gov/std/saw/resources.htm

For info on older adults and sexual health, see 

https://www.health.ny.gov/diseases/aids/general/publications/docs/sexual_health_older_adults.pdf

To read the article, visit AARP here

From AARP: Latest findings on heart health

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The American Colllege of Cardiology held its annual meeting in April. Here are some new things to ponder.

Coffee, in moderation, might be good for you

For people without heart disease, research has shown that 2 or 3 cups a day was associated with 10-15% lower risk of developing heart disease. And for people who did have heart disease, 2 or 3 cups was associated with a lower risk of dying. 

Voice analysis may reveal things about heart health

There is some evidence to show that analyzing features of voice may show who is likely to develop heart problems. It won't replace current methods, but could supplement them to tell doctors more.

Excess noise could be bad for your heart

Researchers found that people who live in noisy neighborhoods have a higher rates of heart attack. These studies suggest that along with traditional risk factors like smoking or diabetes, researchers should consider both air and sound pollution.

Smart Watch data doesn't apply the same to everyone

Watches and wearable that measure heart rate seem to be less accurate the same for dark skinned individuals. Future research should  emphasize the inclusion of populations of all skin tones so more is known about  variations in skin light absorption.

People with anxiety/ depression may get more benefit from exercise

Everyone benefits from getting People at least 150 hours of moderate to intense exercise per week. But people with anxiety and depression may get a greater cardiovascular benefit from physical activity. 

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Did you know

that the Food Bank

of Central New York offers a 

co-op for everyone?

No  qualifications,

no subscriptions,

no requirements

to participate.

Food $en$e is a monthly food buying co-op for anyone who wants to stretch their grocery dollars. The program provides a monthly box of 12-15 staple grocery items at a discounted price.

Each package costs $20.50. There is no limitation to the number

of packages you may buy. While the items vary from month to month,

the package always includes:

  • 4-5 meat items like chicken, ground beef or fish

  • 4-5 staple pantry items like pasta, soup, and rice

  • 2 fresh produce items like apples, carrots or oranges

Call  

(800) 444-1562 or (315) 437-1899

or click here  to get started.

Check out the monthly FoodSense newsletter here

All of the cool kids are doing it -- colorectal cancer screenings

It might be the time to have "the talk" with your younger relatives and friends. You can see it in action in the video here, entitled "The Bums and the Bees." Regular screening, beginning at age 45, is the key to preventing colorectal cancer (cancer of the colon or rectum). If you’re 45 to 75 years old, get screened for colorectal cancer regularly. If you’re younger than 45 and think you may be at high risk of getting colorectal cancer, or if you’re older than 75, talk to your doctor about screening. Colorectal polyps and colorectal cancer don’t always cause symptoms, 

especially at first. That is why getting screened regularly for colorectal cancer is so important

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